Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Archaeologists from Cardiff University Discover Ancient Roman Buildings


Archaeologists from the University have made a major new discovery that will change the way we think about how Britain was conquered and occupied by the Roman army almost 2,000 years ago.
A complex of monumental buildings has been located outside the Roman fortress at Caerleon in South Wales, which is likely to lead to a complete rethink of one of the country's most important Roman sites.

The discovery was fortuitous - students from the School of History, Archaeology and Religion were learning how to use geophysical equipment in fields outside the fortress that were not thought to have been extensively occupied in the Roman period. 10 days later, the students and their tutors had revealed the outlines of a series of huge buildings squeezed into the ground between the amphitheatre and the River Usk.
Dr Peter Guest, Senior Lecturer in Roman Archaeology at the School said: "Caerleon is one of the best-known Roman sites in Britain, so it was a great surprise to realise that we had found something completely new and totally unexpected. We've discovered the remains of several very large buildings shown remarkably clearly on the geophysical surveys completed by our students.

at: http://www.britarch.ac.uk/caf/wikka.php?wakka=CaerleonLegionaryFortress